Local Landscape

What makes Here… Here

The Virtual Ohio State Fair 2020

2019 Ohio State Fair Butter Cow

2019 Ohio State Fair Butter Cow

Today is the start of the start of The Ohio State Fair. Normally the fair is one of the largest in the country. Due to the current situation of the world the State fair of Ohio has gone virtual. Now anyone anywhere can attend.

Want some history of the Fair before you attend? the podcast has great backstories and information: https://ohiostatefair.com/podcast/

How to attend:

The Ohio State Fair has created a great website to visit the Virtual Fair:  https://ohiostatefair.com/anywhere/
The site contains links to a virtual midway, Entertainers and Attractions, Food Demonstrations, Fair Competitions, Music, Recipes, a Shop with many of the vendors that would be at the fair, and so much more. It even has a large selection of historical playlist and information.

Along with the virtual fair are links to the Fair’s Youtube, Twitter, and Instagram pages where much of the virtual fair including Contest, photos, videos, and more will be posted.

The Virtual Fair will run from July 29 – August 8th, 2020

Photo Hunt: Middletown

We love getting out and exploring the great state of Ohio. This time we went to Middletown. The city lies on the northern edge of  Cincinnati-Middletown, OH–KY–IN Metropolitan Statistical Area. The downtown is a great place to walk and view all the great art work. There are a few art galleries that have works as well as active studios. The oldest continually running glass studio , BeauVerre, is located downtown.  When we went the town had an animal safari / scavenger hunt going on.

Drive-In Restaurants of Ohio

In the 1950’s Drive-ins were all the rage. A place where a family could take the kids without having to dress up. A place where teens could meet up and hang out. While the Drive-in movie theatre has updated with new technology and moved in to the modern area, many a drive-in restaurant has keep the look and feel of the early days.

The old fashioned atmosphere helps to make them less of a fast food joint and more of a community gathering place. Most of the drive-ins in Ohio opened in the 60’s or before and the old fashion decor is not just a gimmick but tradition. Unlike a drive through where there is another car waiting to be served and one must get it and go, these places are more about parking, being waited on by the friendly staff, and enjoying the good food and good times. The pace of life seems to take a breather as the nostalgia over comes the place.

So here is a list of a few places to find a good burger, fries, and of course a frosty root beer.


Cincinnati:
https://www.therootbeerstand.com 

Cleveland and Northeast: http://swensonsdriveins.com (many locations from Columbus north)

Columbus: https://www.dansdrivein.com/

Chillicothe: http://www.sumburger.com

Dayton: http://www.rootbeerstande.com

Tiffin: http://www.jollysdrivein.com

And so many more:  Just look for one in any area of Ohio and chances are there’s one nearby.

In Ohio the weather can be unpredictable. Sometimes the winter is harsh and early. Sometimes it is mild and hard to find. Because it is hard to work in winter conditions, some of the Drive-ins are only open seasonally.

Drive-Ins of Ohio are now open

Cars at Drive in

Old Drive In

Since the beginning of the movie theater industry movies have been shown outdoors. The reasons have varied. Be it lack of indoor air conditioning or lack of a building all together. In 1933 someone decided to make it so that theater goers could watch a movie in the comfort of their own cars. Thus the Drive In Movie theater was born. Ohio, leader not a follower, was no late comer to the fad. In the heyday of the drive-ins Ohio was strong. During the decline, Ohio held strong.

The Drive-in is a right of passage for all Ohioans. From the first time one sees the screen through the front windshield to the moment the last frame is displayed the drive-in is an experience like no other. If a patron feels like talking, texting, running, sitting, or eating loudly this is okay because the Drive-in is a place of personal space. With the ability to personalize everything from the level of the sound to the temperature in ones car. Every vehicle is ones own private theater. Yet still the drive-in is  able to convey a sense of community. Exit the car and the sounds of the movie mingle with the sounds of nature and other patrons. As long as everyone keeps things with in reason the sky, literally, is the limit.

Some Tips for Drive-In Enjoyment:

  • Check the locations official website for rules. Some charge to bring in outside food others don’t. A quick check can prevent many problems
  • Visit the concession Stand at least once. The food is where a lot of the Drive-ins make their money. Also the food is reasonably priced and the selection quite large.
  • Plan for a late night. If two movies are playing, and the first one can’t start until dark, the last one won’t generally end till after midnight.
  • Bring a portable radio. Most places use radio transmissions for sounds delivery. A portable radio means you won’t miss any of the soundtrack on a restroom break or snack run.
  • Arrive early to get a good spot.
  • Most allow movement between the screens and time the movies so that if you want to see one from one screen and one from the other you can. Do not expect to get a great spot if you move to the more popular second movie.

No matter where you live in the state there is a drive in with in a reasonable drive.

Cincinnati: Starlite Drive-In

Cleveland and the northeast area: There are a lot of them. probably the most dense area.  (list of Drive-ins)

Columbus:  Skyview Drive-In

Dayton: Melody 49 Drive-In, Dixie Twin Drive-In

Hamilton: Holiday Auto Theatre 

Toledo: Tiffin Drive-In Theatre, Field of Dreams Drive-In Theatre, Sundance Kid Drive-In

Along with many others:

P.s. Most drive-ins offer double features with the price still lower than the average movie ticket.

Ohio in the round: COSI

As we have been working to bring you closer to the sights of Ohio we have felt like photos were missing something. Now we bring to you 360° photospheres of our state. They can be clicked and dragged, or any device with a motion sensor should be able to move around and track the photo.

We start with the Center of Science and Industry’s Progress Exhibit.

1898:


Not a video, a 360° photo. Click and drag to see more, or use mobile device and move device around.

1962:


Not a video, a 360° photo. Click and drag to see more, or use mobile device and move device around.

if this does not work in your browser here are the photos:

360 of COSI Progress Exhibit: 1892

360 photosphere of COSI Progress Exhibit: 1892

360 of COSI Progress Exhibit: 1962

360 photosphere of COSI Progress Exhibit: 1962

Patterson Homestead Plaque

Patterson Homestead

https://www.daytonhistory.org/visit/dayton-history-sites/patterson-homestead/

1815 Brown St, Dayton, OH 45409

Before Ohio could become a state it needed residents. Before settlers would arrive there needed to be someone to explore the area and decide on a good place to settle. Along the Ohio river in what is now southwest Ohio that group was American Revolutionary War Col. Robert Patterson, Israel Ludlow, John Filson, and Matthias Denman. They bought a portion of land from the Symmes Purchase and founded the city of Losantiville, which was later renamed Cincinnati. After all his fighting and founding Patterson decided to settle down in the newly formed city of Dayton in 1804. He would stay there until his death in 1827. The homestead he left would go on to house 3 generations of his family, including John Patterson, the Industrialist and founder of NCR.

At one point the homestead covered 3 sq miles and was a major fixture of the city. The house is a small 2 story structure located on top of a hill. It has three rooms on each of its two floors. At the time of its construction it was adequate for it use. The majority of the family’s life would have been spent out on the large farm.  Over the years that farm became the University of Dayton, NCR national Headquarters, and many other places in the city.

Today the homestead is a museum and event center near the University of Dayton. The house is open once a month during most months of the year for a free open house and tours. Tours are given by well informed guides and only take an hour. The house is not much different than other historic homes of the era. While it is a simple home tour, the nearby Woodland Cemetery , where Robert Patterson and many of his family are buried, can make a full day of Dayton history.

CRYPTOZOHIO: Creepy Columbus

Cryptozohio - Stories from the Depths

We have talked about a lot of creepy places across the city before. The ghosts of OSU, the creepy graves of Green Lawn, the creepy creatures of the Ohio History Center, or the most haunted government building. Here are a few more creepy places:

Camp Chase:
During the Civil war space was needed to train soldiers. Space was also needed to house prisoners of the war. Camp Chase was such a place. Unfortunately not all the prisoners made it to the end of the war. The training grounds are gone but the graves remain in the Camp Chase Cemetery. A lady in grey is said to be found from time to time searching the grave markers for her lost love. Soldiers have also been reported come back to the site.

Ghost Trolley:
Just outside Columbus is a little hidden gem of a museum. The Ohio Railway Museum. While most of the state may not know of the place, come October it is crowded with people hoping to get a ride on the Ghost Trolley. Aimed at younger kids, riders are given a short ride then the lights are turned out and the story of the Ghost Trolley is told.

Chief Leatherlips:
Chief SHATEYORANYAH was a Wyandot leader. He was well liked by most and was given the name “leatherlips” because he always kept his promises. He was also one of the signers of the Treaty of Greenville. He was also worked with the American settlers. This angered many of his people, including his brother Roundhead. He ordered Leatherlips executed for witchcraft.  He was buried in Dublin, Ohio.

After his death the site was untouched until 1889 when a monument was built. As the story goes when it was built workers unknowingly had the correct location and disturbed his bones. The bones were replaced and the headstone was lovingly placed. All was good. A local golf tournament that is held nearby is said to be cursed however for bringing to much traffic and noise to the area. Almost every year the event is rained on, with it having to be shortened some years.

In a near by park is a larger statue honoring the man. This statue is more well known and is where most people visit. The head is large and an overlook is on top it. The face seems to be staring off in to the distance.

Otherworld:
Otherworld (https://otherworldohio.com) is a permanent art display in an abandoned shopping center. It is a strange place with things everywhere, but unlike an art museum this place is open for touch. Half of the exhibit is just figuring out what is interactive and what is not. There is no description to the story and the visitor must find out what is going on on their own. All that is known is

“You have volunteered as a beta tester at Otherworld Industries, a pioneering tech company specializing in alternate realm tourism. But upon arrival at the desolate research facility, you’re left on your own… Exploring restricted laboratories inevitably leads you to discover a gateway to bioluminescent dreamscapes featuring alien flora, primordial creatures, and expanses of abstract light and geometry…”

The whole place is well themed and trippy. While the place is not haunted it is very creepy. The artists did a great job of theming the location. Every room is different but fit well together. A great place to have a night out and be creeped out, without worrying about bringing anything strange back with you.